Resolving food shortage by strategic food distribution

However, despite this alarming truth, nearly 1 billion people are suffering from chronic hunger today. There are a wide range of factors that contribute to this problem, but perhaps one of the most significant is poor food distribution. The amount of food calories being produced fulfills and exceeds the minimum amount needed per person.

Resolving food shortage by strategic food distribution

Share via Email The rising global population means not just more mouths to feed, but more sophisticated tastes to satisfy as developing countries grow wealthier.

And as demand for food increases around the world, supply capacity is struggling to keep up with these changing requirements - with potentially dire consequences for every nation. Without direct and effective action, the poor of the world face great suffering.

In the last 12 months alone, according to the FAO, million have joined the world's hungry, and 22 countries remain particularly vulnerable to chronic hunger.

Is food distribution, rather than food shortage, the cause of world hunger? | attheheels.com

But in developed countries, too, the availability and cost of food will begin to carry a political, economic and social significance not seen for generations. To help understand the implications of change for the EU and UK, Chatham House, home of the independent international affairs thinktank the Royal Institute of International Affairs, has developed four scenarios that explain possible future pictures of global food supply.

These have been used to help representatives of the UK's wheat and dairy supply networks to focus on the challenges they face and the choices they may have to make: In broadly the same timescale of two to three years, good weather allows global yields to recover.

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Food input costs decline as geopolitical conditions improve and the oil price drops, undercutting biofuel production. Food prices drop back, though they remain volatile because of continuing speculative investment.

This scenario demonstrates the extent to which all the main price-determining factors would have to play out favourably if food prices are to fall back to more familiar levels. As a possibility, it is considered by many in the UK food supply industry to be too complacent.

There is a widely-held view that, even if some easing back in commodity prices is seen, something more akin to structural change is occurring in global food production and supply.

Food inflation Global demand for food continues to grow and persistently outpaces production growth, albeit by a narrow margin. Investments in production technology ensure that global food production capacity is not overwhelmed, but the proportion of personal income spent on food ends its long-run downward trend.

The economic logic of this scenario is currently a topic of debate among investors. The world economy appears to be heading for a recession, and normally, under these conditions, commodity prices would be falling in expectation of reduced economic activity.

Yet they remain high. Sustained food inflation will create a number of challenges on the domestic front and all sectors will find it difficult to access the capital investment necessary to meet raised productivity targets. Into a new era Climate change worsens and global oil supply contracts, keeping food supply input costs high.

Resolving food shortage by strategic food distribution

Per capita production falls steadily. A dramatic shift in food production and manufacturing in general becomes unavoidable; the new emphasis is on "regenerative", rather than "extractive", practices.

Resolving food shortage by strategic food distribution

This scenario will require the development of new supply concepts, policies and structures, with the drive for technological innovation and the need for significant levels of agricultural investment seen as converging concerns.

Whether sufficiently high yields can be achieved through an alternative production paradigm is certainly controversial, particularly as the whole concept entails change to existing models of food production and delivery.

But many observers maintain that numerous pockets of innovation are already pushing in this direction. The new, radical circumstances prevailing will require industry to develop different competitive models - ones that derive market edge from their compliance with environmental and ethical standards.

Solving the food crisis - OECD

Government will need to decide whether it is to be the driver or facilitator of the new supply system's development. Potentially important areas of policy making include waste and the promotion of better resource management, the expansion of agricultural and food system capacity, and investment in science and technology.

This causes universal public shock and growing political panic. The struggle, even in the developed world, is to keep people fed. With prices skyrocketing, the crisis response creates an untested set of supply arrangements.Definitions.

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Food shortages could be most critical world issue by mid-century Date: April 17, Source: Texas A&M AgriLife Communications Summary: The world is less than 40 years away from a food shortage. Consequently, the high food prices, shortages, reduced food consumption and worsened nutrition associated with the crisis has far- reaching and multi-faceted repercussions for all countries. A catastrophic food shortage due to lack of food or difficulties in food distribution, affecting large numbers of people due to climatic, environmental, socio-economic reasons or extreme political conditions such as tyrannical government or warfare.

the population has sufficient purchasing power to gain access to its food needs. Strategic grain reserves help address the stability problem. By providing a breathing space between the identification of the possibility of either a national or a localised food shortage occurring and making the.

A catastrophic food shortage due to lack of food or difficulties in food distribution, affecting large numbers of people due to climatic, environmental, socio-economic reasons or extreme political conditions such as tyrannical government or warfare.

This shortage severely increases the prices for the consumers, but does not increase the income of farmers that originally sell the crop. Therefore, the incomes of the producers are either stagnant or decreasing, perpetuating the poverty and hunger cycles.

Inadequate Food Distribution Systems;. Consequently, the high food prices, shortages, reduced food consumption and worsened nutrition associated with the crisis has far- reaching and multi-faceted repercussions for all countries. Unravelling solutions for Future Food problems from Utrecht University.

Our society depends on the availability of food and accessibility to it. According to the United Nations nearly million people are hungry and on the other hand, over People are going hungry not because of a food shortage, but rather because of problems with food access, distribution, waste, and inappropriate government subsidies By Dr.

Mercola The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently released their latest data on food security in the US.

The Food Crisis is Not About a Shortage of Food